Lessons of 2019 – December

Lessons of 2019 – December.

 

This is the twelfth and final part in a blog-series about the lessons I’ve learned this year. Read the full into in the January post, but basically I’m sharing the stand-out lessons from the last year in the hope that they will inspire and encourage others, and I also want to urge you all to be intentional about capturing and retaining the lessons that will make you a better person. Here is December’s lesson…

 

December’s Lesson: Good things can distract you from the best things.

 

 

My final lesson this year is one about focus. There are lots of ways we can spend our time, but they are not all equally good. In fact, sometimes a good thing can keep you from doing a better thing.

 

Flipped on its head, this means there are things we’re doing that we shouldn’t be doing, not because they’re bad, but because they’re not the best. We should prioritise our time and our focus for what’s best, not just for what’s good.

 

You could waste a life doing what’s good if you never get round to what’s best. What’s the best thing you could be doing with your life right now? What one thing would you do if you weren’t doing all those other, lesser things?

 

I know I’m guilty of this, often not getting round to the most important things because I’m doing good things of less importance. It might be elaborate procrastination, because I’m daunted by that best thing, or not sure how to start. It might be spreading myself too thin by trying to do much, or it might be because I’m letting the urgent elbow out the important. It could even be because I’m not yet good enough at saying no to good things. What if the problem is not that we’re uncommitted, but that we’re over-committed?

 

There are things that only you can do. There are things which you’re meant to do, called to do, born to do. And then there’s everything else. If more of us were more focused and less distracted, we could do some amazing things. We could have real impact or bring about real change.

 

So, knowing that I’m not very good at this yet, I’m going to carry this lesson with me into 2020. I want to be more focused, less distracted, and more invested in the most worthwhile uses of my time. I don’t want to be spread so thin that I’m strong nowhere. I don’t want to be attending to so many things that I can’t meaningfully process any of them. That means stopping doing some good things. But I’m hoping it’ll help me make more progress with the best things.

 

What good thing do you need to stop doing so you can do the best thing with your life?

 

***

 

January’s Lesson: Don’t Worry About Tomorrow, God is Already There.

February’s Lesson: Inconsistent Parents Raise Insecure Children.

March’s Lesson: Thank God for what He is going to do, even though you don’t know how He is going to do it.

April’s Lesson: Dream Big but Start Small.

May’s Lesson: Ambition is the path to success; persistence is the vehicle you arrive in.

June’s Lesson: Stop thinking about what you don’t have and start using what you do have.

July’s Lesson: Be king, for everyone is facing a great battle.

August’s Lesson: It’s the things that no one sees which result in the blessings everyone wants.

September’s Lesson: Your life will move in the direction of what you think about most.

October’s Lesson: Control your own personal narrative at the end of each day – or someone else will.

November’s Lesson: It’s not happiness that makes us grateful; it’s gratitude that makes us happy.

December’s Lesson: Good things can distract you from the best things.

 

Thanks for following this blog-series. I hope it’s been helpful or encouraging to you in some way. If so, please pass it on to someone else. I’d also encourage you to think about what you’ve learned this year, and who you could share it with so others can benefit. Please subscribe to my blog to read more great content in 2020, and have a wonderful Christmas. God bless, Michael.

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